Monday, 15 May 2017

Billy Ritchie - The ABC Of 1-2-3


(This book review first appeared in issue #62 of Shindig! magazine.)

Ingram

The reputation of 1-2-3 has been steadily growing since the first magazine articles appeared in the mid-'90s championing the Scottish trio. “The greatest band you never heard of” claim carries weight when you stack up the musicians who've cited the band as a major force or influence. Pete Townshend, Paul McCartney and David Bowie were all big fans. Marquee manager John Gee would go on to say they were the best band he saw in all his years at the club.

Billy Ritchie's place in popular music history is assured by being the man who introduced David Bowie to Jimi Hendrix but his true legacy is his musicianship. As a self taught child keyboard prodigy and through a succession of bands Ritchie made the journey from post-war Forth, Scotland, to the hip hangouts of swinging London and stadium tours of the States before walking away from music altogether.

Ritchie convincingly makes the case for 1-2-3 having been pioneers and architects of what would later become keyboard-led progressive rock, openly naming and shaming those who took influence from him and went on to reap vast rewards. (I won't spoil it for you here by repeating the names!)
Unflinchingly honest about the musical decline and industry machinations that failed to keep the band in the public eye, Ritchie is equally adept at analysing band chemistry, breaking down that elusive alchemy all collaborative musicians yearn for. A fascinating read and one which will have you re-thinking everything you know about the history of progressive rock.